Soviet Art

USSR Culture

Category Archive: Cinema-Theater

Pride of the Soviet people – Unsurpassed Soviet ballet

'Giselle'. N. Bessmertnova. Pride of the Soviet people - Unsurpassed Soviet ballet

‘Giselle’. N. Bessmertnova. Pride of the Soviet people – Unsurpassed Soviet ballet

Pride of the Soviet people – Unsurpassed Soviet ballet
First of all, the main features of the Soviet ballet – the ideological content, realistic orientation, and the organic connection with folk art. The keeper of the values ​​of the classical choreographic heritage, our Soviet ballet fruitfully developed the best traditions of Russian ballet art. Also, substantial realistic ballets created in the Soviet era – diverse in genres. In particular, heroic-revolutionary ballets, dramatic, lyric-comedy, tragedy, legendary-epic and fabulously enchanting.
Besides, the Soviet ballet theater is multinational. This gave it an amazing multicoloredness. Traditionally, each nationality brings its own features and characteristics to the created ballet productions, although it builds them on a common basis – classical choreography. The performing style of our ballerinas and dancers was remarkable for its naturalness and nobility.
The achievements of Soviet ballet art have gained wide international recognition. Numerous tours of ballet theatrical troupes and soloists – representatives of various national republics of the Soviet Union – went on abroad with triumphant success. In all countries of the world they admire the skill of the artists of the Soviet ballet, the significance of the repertoire, note the technical perfection, meaningfulness and spirituality of the performance.
The strength of the ideological, aesthetic, moral impact of the Soviet ballet is multiplied by its humanistic orientation.
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Soviet film actress Nina Maslova

Soviet film actress Nina Maslova

Tsarina Marfa Vasilyevna in the comedy film ‘Ivan Vasilievich changes his profession’, directed by Leonid Gaidai. Soviet film actress Nina Maslova

Soviet film actress Nina Maslova
Born on November 27, 1946 in Riga, Nina Maslova is a famous Soviet Russian film actress. She spent her childhood in the city of Nikolaev in Ukraine, and, according to her, it was not cloudless. The girl had a difficult relationship with her mother (she was very rude), so her stepfather brought her up. No wonder, the only dream of Nina was to leave her home. And while it was impossible to do this, she was in conflict with her mother (she cut her veins twice) and spent time in courtyard companies. Hence the taste of alcohol, she knew early – at 11 years of age, drinking with friends a bottle of cheap wine.
At the age of 18, Maslova’s dream finally came true – she escaped from her humbled parent home. Fell in love with the young Muscovite Alexander, who came to Nikolayev to work, she soon found himself with him in Moscow. And there she joined the Institute of Land Reclamation with him. It was in 1964. And the next year Maslova broke up with both – her Sasha and the institute, as became interested in actor’s profession.
Fortunately, in 1965 Maslova entered the School-Studio of the Moscow Art Theater. She lived in a hostel, where her neighbors were the future stars of Soviet cinema – Yekaterina Vasilyeva and Yekaterina Gradova.
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Soviet Russian actress Galina Polskikh

Soviet Russian actress Galina Polskikh

Soviet Russian actress Galina Polskikh

Soviet Russian actress Galina Polskikh
“… I think that I became an actress not accidentally,” says Galina Polskikh, “when I was playing, I filled a terrible emptiness in my life, I lived in an imaginary world.”
Born in Moscow on November 27, 1939, Galina Polskikh Soviet Russian theater and film actress.
Galina practically does not remember her parents: during the war, when she was only three years old, her father was killed at the front, and in 1947 her mother died from anemia. Therefore, at the age of 8, Galina was in the orphanage. However, she didn’t stay there for long. Soon her maternal grandmother, Efrosinia Andrianovna, moved to Moscow from Kaunas and took care of her grandchildren. They settled in the former parental 9-meter basement room in Sretenka. Their house was opposite the store “Mushrooms-berries”, where the grandmother got a job as a cleaner.
After graduating from school in 1956, Galina Polskikh decided to go to All Union Institute of Cinematography. According to Polskikh, at first, she even did not understand that acting was not just a game, but a profession, work. She entered the course to famous Soviet film director Mikhail Ilyich Romm.
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Famous Soviet episode actress Nina Agapova

Famous Soviet episode actress Nina Agapova

From seven to twelve (movie almanacs). 1965. Famous Soviet episode actress Nina Agapova

Famous Soviet episode actress Nina Agapova
Born on May 30, 1926 in Moscow, Nina Agapova is the famous Soviet episode actress. Her parents lived in the same village near Kolomna, and later moved to Moscow to feed themselves. The mother of the future actress began working in a weaving factory, and her father traded in a private shop. However, in August 1945, he died of tuberculosis. Nina from childhood was artistic and had a beautiful voice. In the summer of 1941, when the war was already in full swing, she entered the Russian folk choir named after Yarkov and traveled all over the country with concerts. She performed in the Far East, in Asia, in the Crimea and even on the Karelian front. There she very quickly got into soloists and even played the main role (bride) in the theatrical performance “Russian Wedding”. Apparently, she would sing in the choir, but immediately after the war she feel in love with cinematography.
Together with her friends, Nina often ran to Mosfilm to earn extra money in episodic scenes. And one day she caught the eye of the assistant director Viktorov, who helped M. Romm to make the film “Man No. 217”. And it was him who advised Agapova to try her luck in acting. Accordingly, she entered the All Union Institute of Cinematography, the acting and directing course of S. Yutkevich and M. Romm. There her classmates were the future stars of Soviet cinema. In particular, Vladimir Basov, Rezo Chkheidze, Tengiz Abuladze, Vitaly Melnikov and Yuri Sarantsev.
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Soviet Russian actress Irina Feofanova

Soviet Russian actress Irina Feofanova

As Masha, “Russian business”. 1993 film. Soviet Russian actress Irina Feofanova

Soviet Russian actress Irina Feofanova

Born on April 18, 1966 in Penza in the family of hereditary builders, Irina Feofanova is a Soviet Russian actress. The Feofanov family lived in Penza until 1979, and then moved to Moscow. Irina began to study in the sixth grade of one of the capital’s schools with a biological bias. Noteworthy, Irina graduated from the school in 1983 with honors and, on the advice of her parents, entered the construction institute – MISI named after Kuibyshev. And then a story happened to her, very similar to what once happened to Vladimir Vysotsky. He, too, at the insistence of his parents, began to study at MISI, but survived only a year, after which he moved to the actors. Irina herself, despite her inherent shyness, always secretly dreamed of acting profession. So, in six months she left the instite for the Theater Studio at Usachevka, and focused entirely on studying in the studio. There she played a major role in the play by E. Radzinsky “She is in the absence of love and death.” And not to ‘sit her parents’ neck”, she worked as a postwoman.
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Soviet theater and film actress Kyunna Ignatova

Soviet theater and film actress Kyunna Ignatova (26 September 1935 - 21 February 1988)

One of the most beautiful women of the time, Soviet theater and film actress Kyunna Ignatova (26 September 1935 – 21 February 1988)

Soviet theater and film actress Kyunna Ignatova
Born on September 26, 1935 in Moscow, in the family of a ballerina and an academician, Kyunna Ignatova was half Sakha (Yakut). Although given the name Galina at baptism, officially she was registered as Kunna, which means “sunny” in Yakut. However “sunny” name did not work that name – her creative career was neither bright nor sunny: there were too many “clouds” in her life, and as a result – an early death.
In the summer of 1953, after graduating from the ten-year school, Kyunna Ignatova entered the Shchukin Theater School, the course of Cecilia Mansurova (later another teacher – Iosif Rapoport). Already a year after entering the school Ignatova received a role. It was Leonid Gaidai who found the actress for the role of Lyana, or Lenutsia in the film “Lyana”.

Frankly, the film did not become a revelation, but what’s important is that thanks to the film Gaidai and Ignatova became friends. And two years later they met again on the same set. And this time Gaidai acted as the main director, and Ignatova was again the performer of the main role. It’s about the film “Long Way”, which became the directorial debut of Gaidai.
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Soviet Russian actress Elena Bushueva-Tsekhanskaya

Soviet Russian actress Elena Bushueva-Tsekhanskaya

Was there Carotin? 1989 film directed by Gennady Polok. Soviet Russian actress Elena Bushueva-Tsekhanskaya

Soviet Russian actress Elena Bushueva-Tsekhanskaya
Born on January 26, 1960, Elena Bushueva-Tsekhanskaya – the famous dubbing actress. In fact, everyone in the Soviet Union knew and loved her voice, which literally hypnotized everyone. However, few knew her face. And the riddle is simple. She was the voice of the first Brazilian TV series shown in the USSR (16 October 1986).
In fact, “Slave Izaura” was incredibly popular among Soviet people. Firstly, the positive heroine was an honest, unhappy and oppressed girl (voiced by Elena Bushueva). Secondly, it stigmatized slavery. And third, it was the first soap opera in the USSR.
Meanwhile, specially for the USSR, the telenovela was re-assembled into a format more customary for the Soviet viewer – 15 series for 60-70 minutes. The first 5 series of the television series appeared on Central Television on October 16-20, 1988, the sequel – February 26 – March 7, 1989. And in September 1990, at the request of viewers, the Central television repeated the series.
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