Soviet Art

USSR Culture

Order of the October Revolution

Order of the October Revolution View of the order from the front and back

View of the order from the front and back. Order of the October Revolution

The creation of a sketch for the Order of the October Revolution was entrusted to the artist Valentin Prokhorovich Zaitsev, who developed models for many orders and medals. All the main state symbols of that time are involved in the composition: the red banner, the hammer and sickle, the five-pointed star and the legendary cruiser Aurora.

The Order of the October Revolution was made of precious metals, the main material was silver, and the crossed sickle and hammer were cast with the addition of gold, palladium and copper. Blackening was applied on top for decoration and protection. The badge was fastened with an eyelet to a block covered with scarlet silk with light blue stripes. It should be worn on the left side.

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Order of Lenin as the highest award

Order of Lenin 1st type

Order of Lenin 1st type

The Order of Lenin became the third in a row and the main one in terms of seniority in the award system of the Soviet Union. The date of the official establishment is called April 6, 1930, but discussions about its foundation began in the summer of 1926.

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Order of the Red Banner

Order of the Red Banner

Order of the Red Banner

Order of the Red Banner – a pioneer in the award system of the Soviet Union

The development of a new award system began on the personal order of V. I. Lenin, and the initiative came from Nikolai Podvoisky and Leon Trotsky.

The leader of the proletariat imposed a positive resolution on the documents in the last days of August 1918. All six models were designed by Vladimir Vasilyevich Denisov, a graduate of the Stroganov School, who knew engraving and chasing well.

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Hallmarking silver in the USSR how to read the signs on the marking

Assay Office building in Moscow. Hallmarking silver in the USSR

Assay Office building in Moscow. Hallmarking silver in the USSR. 

Hallmarking of silver in the USSR has changed more than once in its history. Immediately after the revolution of 1917, most of the jewelry factories and workshops were closed in Russia. Fearing robberies, the owners of large and small enterprises fled abroad. Assay offices, which were previously engaged in hallmarking silver, ceased their work with the coming to power of the Bolsheviks.

Hallmarking of silver at the dawn of the USSR was of little concern to the Soviet government. The main goal of the authorities was the requisition of jewelry and their further sale abroad, since the state needed funds to finance the world revolution. The first steps to put things in order in the jewelry business were made in 1918, when a commission formed under the Council of People’s Commissars assumed control functions.

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Nadezhda Rumyantseva

Nadezhda Rumyantseva Soviet actress

Nadezhda Rumyantseva Soviet actress

Nadezhda Vasilievna Rumyantseva is a Soviet actress who is widely known for her work in cinema. Despite her talent and charisma, she appeared on the stage only in her early years, after graduating from the institute.

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Lyudmila Khityaeva

Lyudmila Khityaeva

Lyudmila Khityaeva People’s Artist of the RSFSR

The most amazing and brightest actress of Soviet cinema! Lyudmila Khityaeva

Nature generously endowed her with beauty and talent. She shone on screens since the late 50s, giving the audience vivid, memorable images of her heroines. Lyudmila Khityaeva was loved and loved by millions – for her simplicity, sincerity and cheerful disposition.

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Valentina Talyzina

Valentina Talyzina

Valentina Talyzina Soviet actress

Valentina Talyzina has been working at the Theater im. Moscow City Council. She played in performances based on the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky, Alexander Ostrovsky, Tennessee Williams and Bertolt Brecht and in films by well-known Russian directors. Talyzina also voiced the heroine of Barbara Brylskaya in the film “The Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!” and mother of Uncle Fyodor in the cartoon “Three from Prostokvashino”.

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