Soviet Art

USSR Culture

Soviet actress Ninel Myshkova

Soviet actress Ninel Myshkova in Sadko, 1952

Soviet actress Ninel Myshkova (May 8, 1926, Leningrad, USSR – September 13, 2003, Moscow, Russia) – Soviet film and stage actress. Honored Artist of the RSFSR (1976). Film Sadko, 1952

Soviet actress Ninel Myshkova was born May 8, 1926 in Leningrad. Her father, Konstantin Romanovich Myshkov was a lieutenant general of artillery. In the post-revolutionary period, many parents gave their new-born children unusual names, and Konstantin also didn’t remain aloof from these trends. Name Ninel means LENIN is read from right to left, but Ninel herself did not like her name and preferred to be called Eva. In 1947, Ninel graduated from the Theatre School named after Boris Shchukin, where she studied in the studio of V.K.Lvova. On the same course with Ninel Myshkova studied the future stars of Soviet cinema Yulia Borisova, Alla Parfanyak and Elvira Lutsenko.
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Soviet Georgian actress Sofiko Chiaureli

Soviet Georgian actress Sofiko Chiaureli. 'The Color of Pomegranate' (1972)

Soviet Georgian actress Sofiko Chiaureli. ‘The Color of Pomegranate’ (1972) (21 May 1937 – 2 March 2008)

Soviet Georgian actress Sofiko Chiaureli was born May 21, 1937 in Tbilisi, Georgian SSR of the USSR. Her mother was actress Veriko Andzhaparidze and her father – founder of Georgian Musical Comedy Theatre named after Vaso Abashidze, a theater director, artist and filmmaker Michael Chiaureli. Sofiko had two brothers. One of them, Otar Chiaureli, later graduated from the Tbilisi Academy of Arts and became a documentary filmmaker. The second brother of Sofiko, Ramaz Chiaureli, graduated from the Directing Department of State institute of Theatrical Art in Moscow. He directed performances “Far from Moscow” and “Twelfth Night”, and was also engaged in the documentary. Both brothers of Sophiko mysteriously gone from life when they turned 49 years old.
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Soviet Set Designer Boris Knoblok

Soviet Set Designer Boris Knoblok in 1950s

Soviet Set Designer Boris Knoblok, 1950s

Soviet Set Designer Boris Knoblok (April 19, 1903, Moscow – February 4, 1984, Moscow) – Honored Artist of the RSFSR, the winner of the Stalin and the State Prize of the Tatar ASSR. Boris Georgievich Knoblok belonged to a generation of artists who came to the theater decorative art from painting, architecture, graphic. They mastered a new profession, putting their first performances. Many could not withstand the theater test. Knoblok survived, stayed there forever. He perfectly mastered the traditional space of the stage, drama and music, willingly designed there the performances of contrasting genres. But if within the “scene – the box” was not enough for him, and he was constantly looking for the application of his abilities in the circus, cinema and sports.
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6th World Festival of Youth in USSR

Moscow during 6th World Festival of Youth in USSR

Moscow during 6th World Festival of Youth in USSR

VI World Festival of Youth and Students – Youth International festival, which opened July 28, 1957 in Moscow. The guests of the festival were 34,000 people from 131 countries. The slogan of the festival – “For Peace and Friendship”. The head artist of the VI World Festival of Youth and Students in 1957 was Boris Knoblok. One can marvel at the scale of thinking of the artist, his inexhaustible imagination, together with the experience of the joy of collective creativity, the foresight with which he and the organizers of the festival went to meet the people’s initiative, turning the aesthetic factor in the warm hospitality of Muscovites. The symbol of the Youth Forum, which was attended by delegates of leftist youth organizations in the world, became a dove of peace, devised by Pablo Picasso.
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Soviet propaganda porcelain

Plate Soviet propaganda porcelain

Plate ‘Cubist Hammer’. 1919. PV Kuznetsov. Soviet propaganda porcelain

The early USSR period Soviet propaganda porcelain, has become a business card of our country, the same as the jeweler’s art of Faberge, icons, or avant-garde painting. Indeed, nowadays, products from porcelain cost much and sold at the famous auction houses. Meanwhile, vases, plates, cups, dishes and porcelain statuettes were in many Soviet families. But now, the best pieces of the USSR porcelain, and in particular, early Soviet Soviet era, so-called propaganda porcelain is rarity, worth of best museums. In addition, due to the unavailability of items and a sense of historical belonging, and of course, nostalgia for the recent past, such porcelain is now highly collectible.
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USSR Female Aviation Regiment Night Witches

USSR Female Aviation Regiment

USSR Female Aviation Regiment Night Witches – a bomber regiment of the USSR troops, consisting only of women

USSR Female Aviation Regiment “Night Witches” – a bomber regiment of the USSR troops, consisting exceptionally of women. The Regiment was an unusual phenomenon in the Air Forces of the USSR. During the years of the World War II, or the Great Patriotic War, its pilots made many sorties, covering the flag of the regiment with military unfading glory. Brave women of the 46th Guards Taman Red Banner Order of Suvorov of third degree Night Bomber Aviation Regiment flew in tiny fighters in the remote areas to fight the Germans at night. They were armed and trained better than the German Air Force. During the fighting pilots of regiment made 23,672 sorties, many of which helped win important battles, both in Russia, and later, and in Germany. Women were so good and subtle, that German soldiers gave them the nickname «Nachthexen», or “Night Witches.” Their tactic was to fly up to the goal at a certain distance, and then turn off the engine to reduce the noise emitted by aircraft. They gradually reduced height and dropped bombs on the enemy, before anyone had time to notice them.
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Physical Culture Parades in USSR

July 1, 1936 Physical Culture Parades in USSR

July 1, 1936 Physical Culture Parades in USSR

Physical Culture Parades in USSR
“Streets – our brushes, squares – our palettes” – these words by Vladimir Mayakovsky come to mind when you look at archival photos of Physical Culture Parades in USSR. In 1919, the Red Square in Moscow hosted the first parade of athletes and teams of Vsevobuch (system of compulsory military training). The most grandiose parades were held in the capital of the Soviet Union – Moscow. Parades were also held in several other cities of the USSR. In particular, in 1927 in Barnaul the celebration of the 10th anniversary of the October Revolution, with the parade of athletes. Since 1931, the parades have been held annually, first in Moscow and Leningrad, and then in the other cities of the USSR. In 1935, at the parade of athletes in Moscow, Stalin was named “the best friend of the pioneers,” and in 1936 at the athletes parade in Moscow was first introduced the slogan “Thank you Comrade Stalin for our happy childhood!”.
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